Moodle Blog

Moodlefairy’s Magic Sound Box

I love making screencasts. In fact, whenever anyone in my family has an IT problem, my first move is to make them a screencast and let them work their way through it. I’ve always been conscious of the sound quality of such videos however, but when it was still my hobby, it didn’t really matter. I’d use the built in mike of my laptop and it worked OK. But since I started making screencasts as part of my Moodle work I’ve become much more aware of my sound inadequacies. At first I thought I needed a decent microphone – following the advice of Leon Cych I got one – a Samson Go Mic – and I am very happy with it. However, the sound’s still not right.

A couple of years ago I had the opportunity to work in a professional recording studio and I asked the tech guy there about my problem. He said basically that you can have the most state of the art 2000 dollar mike, but if the rooom you are in is not suitable, it won’t make any difference. My issue is that (to me) I always sound as if I am in some  cavernous Victorian room with high ceilings. Probably because I am. I’ve tried taking my laptop out to the garden shed, narrating in the illegally low-ceilinged basement box room and even recording with a velvet curtain wrapped around me – but still not satisfactory. Then by chance, a few months ago, Moodle HQ developer Andrew Nicols pointed out a Kickstarter project for a portable sound recording booth and I thought: that’s the Solution! Sometimes the best ideas are the simplest, and this is simple in its conception: it’s just a padded box, thickly covered in material on the outside and with sound proofing padding on the inside. You can either put it on a table or a stand, and use it with your microphone or smartphone.

To be honest, Mr Moodlefairy could quite easily have made one for me but, impatient that I was, I figured that ordering myself one would get it to me sooner… how wrong I was. Delays dogged the construction and delivery process and it eventually arrived from the USA last week,  5 months late, with an unexpected customs delivery charge  and just after I’d finished my latest batch of Moodle screencasts – but I’m not complaining! The sound is better than I currently have, and it’s so simple to operate. I just put it on the big table in my workroom, put my microphone in it  and off I go.   And when I’ve finished, I just put it away out of sight until next time. And the best thing is – we no longer need to move house to get me better sound quality 🙂 🙂

 

 

Dieser Beitrag wurde am Tuesday, 05. May 2015 um 21:26 Uhr veröffentlicht und wurde unter der Kategorie Moodle abgelegt. Du kannst die Kommentare zu diesen Eintrag durch den RSS-Feed verfolgen. Du hast die Möglichkeit einen Kommentar zu hinterlassen, oder einen Trackback von deinem Weblog zu senden.

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4 Comments »

  1. I’m still not entirely sure how this works – do you have to sit with the box over your head? That surely ends up looking like something from Dr Who? Anyway – it sounds like it sounds good.

    Comment: Andrew Field – 06. May 2015 @ 12:43 pm

  2. I found a quick demo video on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtoazpOJ8QA

    Comment: admin – 06. May 2015 @ 12:45 pm

  3. I’ve been using a Samson Go-Mic for years and love it. Good sound quality in a small portable package and at a reasonable price. I like the sound box idea and will try that to see if it improves my recordings. Thanks!

    Comment: Floyd Saner – 08. May 2015 @ 3:44 am

  4. Mary, if you are going about shopping for a Microphone good for screen/pod casts, then one thing that you have to look for is “CARDIOID”.

    There are 2 MIC’s to recommend, one is Audio Technica AT2020 USB Cardioid Microphone (http://goo.gl/zYcypr) and Other one Blue’s Yeti (http://goo.gl/uezLST) has 4 modes including Cardioid, though HEAVY and looks Ugly (nearly a foot tall), but so far the BEST to use specially when screen casting, you wont even need that sound dampening box.

    Comment: Usman – 14. May 2015 @ 2:55 pm

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