Learn Moodle MOOC week 3: We’re all in it together

Week 3 of our Learn Moodle 3.4 Basics MOOC is all about learning together: practice courses are being shared and the My home country workshop submissions are being automatically allocated to participants to peer assess and experience the process of one of Moodle’s most powerful activities.

While it’s possible to ‘teach yourself Moodle’ and work efficiently in isolation, reading and watching the materials, trying them in your practice course, it’s not only more satisfying but more fun if you can engage with other learners as you do so. We keep coming back to the referents of social constructionism laid out by Chief Moodler Martin Dougiamas in the documentation on Pedagogy, and in particular this one:

All of us are potential teachers as well as learners – in a true collaborative environment we are both.

Thus it’s great to see participants commenting on each other’s courses in the Show us your Moodle course! forum:

Show us Course feedback

Although the MOOC is in English, participants are welcome to post in their own language and are well supported by others. As a result of this, practice courses may also be shared in languages other than English:

Russian Share course

There is a YouTube playlist of videos for the course. Our Greek Moodle partner WIDE Services already translated the subtitles into English, and we thank two course participants Alejandro Vásquez and Mónica Sánchez for their Spanish translations :) Anyone who wishes to is welcome to translate Moodle HQ YouTube videos into other languages.

The other main event of  Week 3 is the ongoing peer assessment workshop. This really is a collaborative effort, and it is this aspect which unfortuntately causes some confusion amongst participants. It is mentioned right at the start of the course in the Important dates page and the Week  1 tutorial that this activity is the only deadline out of 35 activities. Participants must submit a short piece of work ( 3 sentences, an image and a link to a website, all about your home region) before the 24th January. It is also emphasised that the quality of this work does not matter – the object of the exercise is to experience peer assessment with the workshop. The deadline of 24 January is so that Moodle can then hand out to participants five pieces of work from other participants and they then have until January 31st to assess them according to simple criteria. In our final live BBB session on 26 January we again welcomed Helen Foster who screenshared as her test student demonstrating how to do the peer assessments:

BBB Session 26 Janfter the 31st January, we check all is good and close the workshop. Only when the workshop is officially closed do participants receive their completion mark and only when they receive their completion mark will they be able to download their certificate of completion. So you see, we only have a couple of days before the weekend and the course ends for this to take place. For this reason and because of the large number of participants we don’t allow late submissions. (It’s also good for educators to experience deadlines to better empathise with their students.)

At the moment, it’s not possible for participants to submit and peer assess at their own pace. When it is, it will be a great boost to our MOOC!  In the meantime, knowing participants are busy, we offer them as long as possible to submit their three sentences, image and link (between 15 and 8 days depending on the path you take) and then a full week afterwards to peer assess in the hope as many as possible will find the time. And no need to worry if you were too busy during those three weeks (or reading the instructions slipped your mind) because we have a new  certificate of achievement for everyone who completes 34 out of the 35 required activities. I’m  looking forward to the end of next week to see how many participants complete the course (all 35 required activities, including the workshop) and how many do well enough to obtain the certificate of achievement too. Watch this space :)

And the last word, again, goes to one of our reflective bloggers:Reflective blog

 

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